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How the editorial team works at Techday: Our tips for you

18 Jul 16

The Techday editorial team is incredibly busy, as we run 13 tech news websites across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and New Zealand.

Hundreds of press releases and news leads come through our systems every day, which means our editorial team is snowed under at the best of times. By preparing your press releases in a particular way, you’ll not only make our lives easier, but improve your chances of being published.

Understanding our systems:

  • We use an internal system called Newsdesk. This system receives all press releases, interview opportunities, story ideas and blogs, in addition to the ability to monitor our competitors' sites. Each of these automatically become 'story leads'.
  • An editorial team member categorises each story lead by which sites in our network it would be relevant for.
  • Based upon advertising commitments, each site is given a weekly target for stories and page impressions.
  • Our editors monitor which sites are on track to achieve these targets and select which story they should write next by which site needs the most attention.

Our top tips for tech marketers:

  • Relevance to an active issue - The most solid pitches come when the sender of the release relates the product or service back to a current news story and is informative. For example, the government has just been hacked to pieces by cyber criminals and your company offers cyber security solutions with expert opinions on the matter. Interesting! If not, then maybe you should consider a sponsored story.
  • Unless it's big news we don't have time for interviews - As already mentioned, our editors are very time poor, so instead of offering to set up interviews with various people within the industry, in most cases it is much easier (for both sides) to simply send through their thoughts on the matter via email.
  • Sending to Newsdesk - Rather than sending releases to an editor’s email address, send them to nzpr@techday.com, aupr@techday.comeupr@techday.com, uspr@techday.com or asiapr@techday.com as this will send them straight to Newsdesk, meaning they won’t fall through the cracks or clutter our editorial team’s inboxes. If you send to an editor directly, they will just forward it to Newsdesk, so it actually delays it being looked at.
  • Avoid PDFs and Word docs - Using attachments means we have to download the file on our end before we can view it. Simply having the release within the body of the email saves time, storage and makes your lead more appealing.
  • Exclusives are valuable - If you have a relevant, interesting and exclusive release, send it to one of the above emails and we’ll promptly turn it into a news story and feature it prominently across our relevant sites. Put "Exclusive" at the beginning of your subject line if relevant.
  • Subject lines should read like headlines - They should include the brand and the announcement as this makes it easier to sort in Newsdesk plus makes your release stand out.
  • Don't ask permission - We get a lot of emails asking: “Can we send you this press release?” This is a good way for leads to be forgotten about. To boost your chances of publication, forget asking for permission and just send them through.
  • Return the favour - Our team writing up your announcement costs us real money in wages. Work out ways you can support Techday in return. We have advertising, lead capture and case study writing and numerous other services available.

Following these simple tips will make lives on both sides of the press release easier, as it’s more efficient for us and improves your chances of being published.

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