Story image

Reducing operational costs and carbon footprints

01 Apr 12

The message is simple. In order for IT and data centre managers to reduce both their operational costs and carbon footprint they need to start assessing their infrastructure and IT, to identify where legacy systems may benefit from upgrades and quickly deliver ROI.
These challenges mean energy efficiency and security are becoming a core focus for business, and data centre managers are likely to reap the benefits of investing in more efficient technologies to drive down energy use and costs. Making the right investments in the data centre is where the biggest cost and power savings can be made in an office building. But while technology gets updated every few years, physical infrastructure such as power and cooling does not.
This means that a lot of New Zealand’s data centres are housing old, inefficient technology which doesn’t have the power management or cooling capabilities that today’s products are able to deliver.
One of the biggest challenges IT and data centre managers currently face is the increase in energy costs to run their operations. A very obvious way to help is to invest in upgrading IT equipment to the more modern and efficient IT technologies of today, which will lead to long term cost and energy savings.
Channelling opportunities
The channel has an opportunity to educate customers about how to manage energy in the most effective way, through monitoring and measurement of all IT systems. The subsequent reductions in energy consumption will reduce both an organisation’s carbon footprint and energy bill.
The best way to achieve this and increase data centre efficiency is to conduct a holistic data centre assessment and monitor and manage power from the point that it comes into the building, right down to the power at rack and row level.
Understanding the cost of energy and where it is being used is the first step in managing energy effectively. From here it is possible to benchmark usage, monitor trends and measure reductions in energy use (and corresponding cost savings) through the installation of ‘greener’ data centre technology.
Understanding energy management
Energy management platforms will be of increasing importance as requirements to report on carbon emissions increase. Ultimately this will span the office environment and data centre, where all energy data will be stored, managed and compiled for instantaneous reporting.
Knowing how to measure the energy and cost saving from efficient data centre technology is critical for the channel. Customers are wary of ‘green washing’, so resellers who can accurately advise green conscious organisations on measurable IT investments will gain competitive advantage.
Planning for the future
CIOs and data centre managers need to plan for the future. To do this, they need to start looking ahead and assessing data centres on a timeframe. Looking at their data centre infrastructure use over one, three, five and 10 year periods will provide a rough indication of how much a data centre is likely to cost over time both for IT investments (capex) and running costs (opex). The channel can help with this process through operative consultancy.
While many resellers understand the theory on what needs to be done and why, vendors can assist with the practical side and training to help channel partners properly diagnose the data centre opportunities and position them based on various scenarios – capex vs opex, events such as power failures and the introduction of new technologies.
Customers are increasingly looking for energy management advice and consultancy and channel partners need to highlight the business costs associated with ongoing opex through energy costs and contrast that with capex investment in greener data centre technology that will pay itself off over a clearly measurable life cycle.
Enhanced efficiencies
Through the right knowledge, consultancy and practical advice, organisations can signficantly enhance data centre efficiencies. IBM New Zealand now experiences a PUE (power usage effectiveness) of 1.34, making it one of the most efficient data centres in New Zealand, after partnering with Schneider Electric to decrease their energy footprint and manage power more reliably. The testing outlined savings of up to 20,000 kWh per month during cold weather through the installation of new technology.

White box losing out to brands in 100 GE switching market
H3C, Cisco and Huawei have all gained share in the growing competition in the data centre switching market.
Gartner names newcomer Exabeam a leader in SIEM
The vendor landscape for SIEM is evolving, with recent entrants bringing technologies optimised for analytics use cases.
52mil users affected by Google+’s second data breach
Google+ APIs will be shut down within the next 90 days, and the consumer platform will be disabled in April 2019 instead of August 2019 as originally planned.
Genesys PureCloud generates triple-digit revenue growth year on year
In Australia and New Zealand, the company boosted PureCloud revenue by nearly 100%.
Symantec releases neural network-integrated USB scanning station
Symantec Industrial Control System Protection Neural helps defend against USB-borne cyber attacks on operational technology.
IDC: Standalone VR headset shipments grow 428.6% in 3Q18
The VR headset market returned to growth in 3Q18 after four consecutive quarters of decline and now makes up 97% of the combined market.
Kidd made Ingram Micro executive for cloud
Barbara Kidd has been promoted to cloud general manager as the company signs new vendors to its Cloud Marketplace.
Open source will be the next big thing for the channel
Channel firms should be on the lookout for opportunities across open source and more diverse software offerings like software-defined containers and storage.