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Oracle cloud division drives FY18 revenue growth

21 Jun 18

All amounts are in USD

Oracle announced fiscal 2018 US Q4 results and fiscal 2018 full year results with total revenues up 3% to $11.3 billion compared to Q4 last year.

It was a good quarter for Oracle’s cloud divisions as, despite Cloud License and On-Premise License revenues being down 5% to $2.5 billion, Cloud Services and License Support revenues were up 8% to $6.8 billion.

GAAP Operating Income was up 8% to $4.4 billion, and GAAP Operating Margin was 39%.

Non-GAAP Operating Income was up 6% to $5.3 billion, and non-GAAP Operating Margin was 47%.

GAAP Net Income was $3.4 billion, and non-GAAP Net Income was $4.1 billion.

GAAP Earnings Per Share was up 8% to $0.82, while non-GAAP Earnings Per Share was up 11% to $0.99.

At the end of Q4, short-term deferred revenues were up 2% to $8.4 billion, while Operating Cash Flow on a trailing twelve-month basis was up 9%, or $1.3 billion, to a record $15.4 billion.

For the full fiscal year 2018, Total Revenues were up 6% to $39.8 billion compared to fiscal 2017.

FY18 cloud results mirror Q4 with Cloud Services and License Support revenues up 10% to $26.3 billion and Cloud License and On-Premise License revenues down 4% to $6.2 billion.

GAAP Operating Income was up 8% to $13.7 billion, and GAAP Operating Margin was 34%.

Non-GAAP Operating Income was up 9% to $17.6 billion, and non-GAAP Operating Margin was 44%.

GAAP Net Income was $3.8 billion, and non-GAAP Net Income was $13.2 billion.

FY18 GAAP Earnings Per Share was $0.90, while Non-GAAP Earnings Per Share was $3.12.

“Last year, I forecast double-digit non-GAAP earnings per share growth for FY18 and we delivered 14% growth this year, largely driven by strong growth in our cloud businesses,” says Oracle CEO Safra Catz.

“Looking ahead to FY19, I expect revenue growth will enable us to deliver double-digit non-GAAP earnings per share growth once again.”

“We had a great fourth quarter with total revenues more than $200 million above our constant currency forecast,” adds Oracle CEO Mark Hurd.

“Our strategic Fusion ERP and HCM SaaS cloud applications suite revenues grew over 50% in the fourth quarter, and we expect continued strong growth from our Fusion SaaS suites throughout FY19.”

“Some of our largest customers have now begun the process of moving their on-premise Oracle databases to the Oracle Cloud,” says Oracle Chairman and CTO Larry Ellison.

“For example, AT&T is moving thousands of databases and tens of thousands of terabytes of data into the Oracle Cloud. We think that these large-scale migrations of Oracle database to the cloud will drive our PaaS and IaaS businesses throughout FY19.”

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